• OCTOBER 1 - OCTOBER 31
  • Monterey Peninsula College Art Department , Monterey
  • Every 1 week(s) between
    October 1, 2018 and October 31, 2018
  • Categories: Visual Arts, Community

Event Details

  • Every 1 week(s) between
    October 1, 2018 and October 31, 2018
  • Mondays, 11:00 am - 4:00 pm
  • Tuesdays, 11:00 am - 4:00 pm
  • Wednesdays, 11:00 am - 4:00 pm
  • Thursdays, 11:00 am - 4:00 pm
  • Free
  • Admission is free. MPC parking fee: $3.00 (three paper dollars)

Venue

  • Monterey Peninsula College Art Department
  • 980 Fremont Street, Fishnet Road
  • Monterey, CA 93940
  • 831-646-4215
  • http://www.mpc.edu

Event Description

PLEASE JOIN US TO EXPLORE poignant images, powerful ideas, and exquisite painting and drawing in the poetic art of Tom Gehrig and t.c. moore, both of Marin County.

In the words of t.c. moore: Altered Landscapes is an exhibition made with hand-etched mirrors by Canadian environmental artist t.c. moore. These images of plants and animals that are on mirrors vary in size and species and are framed and unframed on wood, metal, plastic, or just pieces of broken shards. The mirrors and their frames are vintage or distressed to speak to the distressing condition of their environments. Images are singular and often floating, presented as parts, like an Albatross’s wing or an Okapi’s tongue. This expresses the fragmented or cut off condition that many of these plants and animals face. Pieces that incorporate horsehair, cowhide, rabbit, and Persian lamb fur bring forth the notion of how something that is abstract can simultaneously be realistic at the same time. Not unlike the sixth extinction.

Artist Tom Gehrig tells us: TOM GEHRIG (b. 1948, Oakland, California) is a Bay Area artist whose work is influenced by many genres, including the Tonalist School of California landscape painting, as well as more recent developments such as performance and conceptual art.

At the core of Mr. Gehrig’s compositions is an intention to set a surreal stage for personal, site-specific happenings. The work references the human condition—the fact that we alter the surface of the planet in both strange and beautiful ways.

Each work is begun by painting a place—real or imagined. That landscape is treated as a starting point and inspiration for a continuously evolving narrative that can include characters as if on a stage and/or props, leaving evidence of human intervention. Initially the work may feel surreal, however they are not hallucinations; rather they key on the innate oddness of reality itself. These “happenings” could actually take place.

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