James Doubek

Doubek started at NPR as a part-time production assistant in 2015 before joining full time as an associate producer in 2017. He previously was an intern at NPR's Washington Desk in the summer of 2015.

A federal judge in New York City has halted, for now, the deportation of a pizza delivery man at least until a hearing on July 20.

Judge Alison J. Nathan of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York ordered Saturday evening for the government to show why a temporary preliminary injunction should not be granted in the case of Pablo Villavicencio Calderon, an Ecuadorean immigrant, according to Villavicencio's lawyers.

The Trump administration's policy of separating families who are detained after illegally crossing the Southern border has become a lightning rod for the White House's critics.

Hundreds of children have already been separated from their parents since Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the policy in May — though the practice has been going on for at least several months.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement says it has acquired new space in federal prisons to house immigrant detainees — more than 1,600 beds.

Because of a "current surge in illegal border crossings" and the Trump administration's "zero-tolerance policy," ICE entered into agreements with the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP), the agency said Thursday.

The U.S. State Department has sent "a number of individuals" from the U.S. Consulate in Guangzhou, China, back to the U.S. after screenings showed they may have been affected by mysterious health problems similar to what diplomats experienced in Cuba.

Two men climbing a granite rock wall known as El Capitan in Yosemite National Park fell to their deaths Saturday morning, the National Park Service said.

The agency said Jason Wells, 46, of Boulder, Colo., and Tim Klien, 42, of Palmdale, Calif., fell from the Freeblast climbing route and did not survive the fall.

Park rangers received calls at 8:15 Saturday morning and responded along with search and rescue staff.

Since the arrests of two black men at a Philadelphia Starbucks in April, several more instances have been documented of mostly white people calling the police on people of color for various reasons, none involving breaking the law — like sleeping in a dorm's common room, shopping, leaving an Airbnb or golfing too slowly.

Police in Nebraska say they've seized 118 pounds of pure fentanyl — one of the largest seizures in U.S. history, they say, and enough to kill more than 26 million people, according to government estimates.

Nebraska State Patrol troopers say they seized the drugs during a traffic stop on Interstate 80 near Kearney on April 26, but at the time suspected most of the powder to be cocaine.

Several people were injured, a few critically, after two men set off a bomb inside an Indian restaurant near Toronto.

The Peel Regional Police said they received a call at 10:32 p.m. ET after two men detonated an improvised explosive device inside the Bombay Bhel restaurant in the city of Mississauga.

Updated at 8 a.m. ET Friday

The Netherlands and Australia are formally blaming Russia's government for the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in 2014, one day after international investigators said the missile that struck the jet originated from the Russian military.

The passenger jet crashed in July 2014 in eastern Ukraine, killing all 298 people aboard.

A jury in Georgia has awarded $1 billion to a young black woman who was raped by an armed security guard when she was 14.

Jurors in Clayton County, Ga., on Tuesday awarded $1 billion in damages to Hope Cheston, now 20, in a civil lawsuit against the company that employed the man who raped her outside an apartment complex.

Cheston's attorney, L. Chris Stewart, called it a "record" amount. "Juries are saying no to sexual assault and holding companies accountable!" he wrote on Twitter.

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