The World on KAZU

Weeknights, 6-7pm
  • Hosted by Lisa Mullins and Marco Werman

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PRI’s The World is a one-hour, weekday radio news magazine offering a mix of news, features, interviews, and music from around the globe. Launched in 1996, PRI’s The World, a co-production of WGBH/Boston, PRI, and the BBC World Service, airs weekdays on over 300 stations across the country.

Like what you heard? Are you so angry that you need to sound off? We welcome your questions, comments, and advice regarding The World. If your message requires a response, a member of staff will respond as soon as possible (usually within two business days).

E-mail: theworld@pri.org
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The World
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When Dave McNeer opened Sunday’s Des Moines Register and saw a four-page advertising supplement paid for by the Chinese government, he shrugged it off. The ad provided China’s perspective about the ongoing trade war between the US and China.

Barranquitas, a rural region of 30,000 people in central Puerto Rico, gets its name from the terrain. Barranca roughly translates to ravine or gully, and the steep slopes here meant the area was especially hard-hit by Hurricane Maria.

Countless landslides blocked roads for weeks. Streets weren’t completely cleared of mud and debris until long after green returned to the lush valleys, three months after the hurricane.

Hundreds of times each day, people settle into individual mirrored booths in a building the heart of Vancouver's Downtown Eastside neighborhood. They unpack the drugs they’ve brought and then do their thing, prepping, then injecting. But here, they shoot up under the watch of a nurse. Clean needles and naloxone are within easy reach. 

Mat Savage credits the place with saving his life.

“I don’t even remember finishing the shot, I just remember bringing it up, starting to do it,” Savage said, describing an overdose from about four years ago.

Alberto Rodríguez has designed an impressive power system for his home in Puerto Rico. A wind turbine and solar panels lead to batteries that are then converted to power for the home.

But Rodríguez isn't trying merely to keep the lights on — he's trying to keep his wife, Mirella, alive. Mirella suffered a stroke about a month after Hurricane Maria came ashore last year. Maria knocked out power to their home, and so if Mirella was to come home from the hospital, Rodríguez had to find a way to generate a stable power supply.

So he did.

The Russian-Turkish agreement to designate a demilitarized zone may have averted an imminent attack on Idlib, but many of the Syrians who live there are still waiting for a more permanent solution to their displacement.

Fatoumata Diawara is on a mission with her music. In a newly released video for her song “Bonya,” the Malian-born musician says we all need and deserve respect.

The video, featured above, was directed by Juan Gomez at Montuno. “Bonya” features a range of influences from 1960s R&B and is laced with sounds from the West African kora.

Singer and student Zere Asylbek wrote a feminist song and produced a video that's provoked ire in many Kyrgyz. They're mad at the clothes she wears in the video — a lacy bra underneath a blazer — and mad about the lyrics, which advocate independence for women. 

The group Pure Detroit gives tours of the city’s gleaming landmarks. And its skeletons. That includes the former Packard factory — 43 abandoned buildings on Detroit’s east side, sprawling shells of concrete with graffiti and rubble. Think: Mad Max or a bombed-out city.

“That's why so many movies are filmed here, because it has that sort of post-apocalyptic look,” said Jacob Jones, who regularly gives tours with the company Pure Detroit. 

A media group based in Washington, DC, launched an ad campaign this week in New York City that targets an exclusive audience: World leaders in town for the 73rd United Nations General Assembly. The goal? An end to the war in Yemen.

One year ago, on the afternoon of Sept. 19, Wesley Bocxe was at home with his wife, Elizabeth Esguerra, in their eighth-floor apartment in the trendy Mexico City neighborhood of Condesa. Elizabeth was in the kitchen preparing lunch. Wesley was in bed with a fever. Their young daughter, Amara, was at school.

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