Salinas Valley

Michelle Loxton

The number of people sickened by the E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce from the Salinas growing region has increased. As of Wednesday, at least 67 people have fallen ill with over half hospitalized. Cases have been reported across 19 states. Federal investigators are working to narrow down the source of contamination. Meanwhile, loads of lettuce are being thrown out this Thanksgiving. 

Erika Mahoney

As the Food and Drug Administration continues investigating the E.coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce from California, literally tons of lettuce are ending up in landfills. Now, some agriculture companies are using a voluntary labeling system to help consumers stay informed and hopefully avoid food waste in the future.

The multistate E. coli outbreak tied to romaine lettuce may have a connection to the Salinas Valley.

Erika Mahoney

Farmworker housing is in crisis. There’s not enough of it and much of what’s available is lousy. A growing number of agriculture companies are building seasonal housing for their workers. But that has it challenges.

Brandt Bates

Thursday AM Update: The CDC reports one person from California has died in connection to this E. coli outbreak from contaminated romaine lettuce. At last count, there are 121 cases with 52 hospitalizations. The cases now span 25 states. 

Doug McKnight

The Monterey Bay’s multi-billion dollar farming industry depends on thousands of farmworkers. But a new study finds there’s a tremendous lack of housing for them.

Erika Mahoney

Located in the heart of the Salinas Valley, Greenfield used to be known as the Broccoli Capital of the World.  Now the small town is banking its future on cannabis.  Greenfield has 11 marijuana grow facilities going up over the next two years.

Doug McKnight

Farmers in the Salinas Valley are worried about how they will plant, grow and harvest crops in the future.

For more than three decades, the number of farm workers in California has been shrinking and those still on the job are getting older.  So, ag companies have been turning to technology for help.

Lisa Morehouse / KQED

If you’ve read your John Steinbeck and listened to your Merle Haggard, or if you grew up in a farmworker family, you know that farm laborers in California have struggled to find decent housing for decades.

Krista Almanzan

Three years ago, Cal State Monterey Bay and Hartnell Community College started an ambitious computer science bachelor’s degree program called CSin3 (formerly CSIT-in-3).