Central Coast Local November 2020 Election Results

Nov 3, 2020

This is KAZU's election results page for the November 2020 election. Here you'll find results for most of the local races, measures and state propositions. This page will be updated periodically. 

ELECTIONS FROM NPR: Live 2020 Election Updates & Results
Presidential | Senate | House | Gubernatorial | California

LOCAL ELECTION RETURNS:
Monterey | Santa Cruz | San Benito California

Updated: 11/25/2020 at 11:00 a.m. PST

  • Monterey County has certified its results. The county has reported a voter turnout of 80.21% -- the highest voter registration level in the history of Monterey County.
  • Santa Cruz County has until December 1, 2020 to certify its results. They are currently reporting a voter turnout of 85.83%. 
  • San Benito County has until December 1, 2020 to certify its results. They are currently reporting a voter turnout of 80.85%

LOCAL CANDIDATE RACES

In the race for U.S Representative District 18, which includes portions of San Mateo, Santa Clara and Santa Cruz counties, the incumbent Democrat Anna Eshoo has 63.2% of the vote and Democrat Rishi Kumar has 36.8% of the vote. 

In the race for U.S. Representative District 20, which covers Monterey and San Benito counties plus parts of Santa Cruz and Santa Clara counties, incumbent Democrat Jimmy Panetta has received 76.8% of the vote. Republican Jeff Gorman has received 23.2% of the vote. 

In the race for State Senate District 17, which covers an area from south of San Jose all the way down to north of Santa Maria, Democrat John Laird has 64.7% of the vote and Republican Vicki Nohrden has 35.3% of the vote.

In the race for State Assembly District 29, which also covers the Monterey Bay Area, incumbent Democrat Mark Stone has received 73.0% of the vote. His challenger Republican Shomir Banerjee has received 27.0% of the vote. 

In the race for State Assembly District 30, which covers the Salinas Valley and cities like Gilroy and Hollister, Democratic incumbent Robert Rivas has 69.6% of the vote and his Republican challenger Gregory Swett has 30.4% of the vote.

In the Monterey County District 4 Supervisor race, which stretches from Marina to Sand City and includes parts of Salinas, Wendy Root Askew has received 52.90% of the vote and Steve McShane has 47.10% of the vote.

In the Santa Cruz County District 1 Supervisor race, which includes Live Oak, Soquel, the Summit Area, Santa Cruz Gardens, and Carbonera, Manu Koenig has 56.71% of the vote and John Leopold has 42.76% of the vote.

In the race to choose the next Santa Cruz County Superior Court Judge, Nancy de la Pena has received 69.34% of the vote. Annrae Angel has received 29.39% of the vote.

LOCAL MEASURES

MONTEREY COUNTY

62.62% of voters have said YES to Measure V. The measure would repair and upgrade aging classrooms and improve access to affordable, high-quality training for students in the Monterey Peninsula Community College District. The measure authorizes $230 million in bonds. 55% voter approval required. 

61.14% of voters have said YES to Measure J. The measure would build a new elementary school to relieve student overcrowding in the Gonzales Unified School District. It would also upgrade school emergency preparations and student Internet access. 55% voter approval required. 

64.58% of voters have said YES to Measure K. The measure would expand vocational education classrooms including engineering, technology and agricultural science. It would also repair high school and adult school classrooms in the Gonzales Unified School District. 55% voter approval required.

56.47% of voters have said YES to Measure H. The measure would repair deteriorating septic systems, improve student safety and upgrade technology in the Shandon Joint Unified School District. 55% voter approval required.

62.86% of voters have said YES to Measure N. The measure would increase and improve student access to modern technology including computers, wiring and educational software in the Soledad Unified School District. It would also construct local teacher-staff rental housing. 55% voter approval required.

63.09% of voters have said YES to Measure W. The measure would upgrade neighborhood schools, improve school security, remove hazardous materials and provide career training in the Salinas Union High School District. 55% voter approval required.

55.00% of voters have said NO to Measure I. The measure would retrofit classrooms for agricultural sciences, upgrade emergency preparedness and increase student access to technology in the San Miguel Joint Union School District. 55% voter approval required.

52.94% of voters have said YES to Measure X. The measure would increase the City of Gonzales’ Temporary Transactions and Use Tax from one-half percent (0.5%) to one percent (1.0%), and extend the life of the tax by 20 years. Majority voter approval required.

60.44% of voters have said YES to Measure T. The measure would enhance public services (health, safety and welfare) for City of Greenfield residents by extending a voter approved 0.75-cent sales tax for a period of 6 years. Majority voter approval required.

68.53% of voters have said YES to Measure P. The measure would amend the King City commercial cannabis tax to include a new tax of up to 5% of gross receipts on the retail sale of cannabis, including hemp products. Majority voter approval required.

80.66% of voters have said YES to Measure Q. The measure would protect the City of Marina from development in current open space areas north of the city limits and along its coast, and encourage efficient development in central Marina and within Marina's portion of former Fort Ord. Majority voter approval required.

71.82% of voters have said YES to Measure Z. The measure would revise the City of Marina's regulations and permit process for commercial cannabis businesses and land uses, while restricting the proximity of such businesses to public parks and recreation centers. Majority voter approval required. 

71.70% of voters have said YES to Measure Y. The measure would increase transient occupancy tax (hotel tax) from 10% to 12% on the cost of rooms paid by hotel guests with proceeds mostly going to essential services such as parks, recreation, library, emergency response and facility rehabilitation. Two-thirds voter approval required. At this time, it's passing. 

59.84% of voters have said YES to Measure L. The measure would increase the City of Pacific Grove’s current 1 percent sales tax to 1.5 percent as a general tax to maintain public safety and emergency preparation; and enhance the city’s infrastructure of parks, trails, beaches and trees. Majority voter approval required.

54.59% of voters have said NO to Measure U. The measure would increase the rate of a transactions and use tax from one percent to 1.5 percent on the retail sale of goods in Sand City. The proceeds would be used to provide general city services. Majority voter approval required.

61.44% of voters have said YES to Measure S. The measure would enact a 0.5 percent increase to the City of Soledad’s Transaction and Use Tax. Proceeds would be used to fund low-cost youth recreation programs, senior programs, animal welfare programs and daycare services. Majority voter approval required.

MONTEREY, SAN BENITO AND SANTA CRUZ COUNTIES

58% of voters have said YES to Measure O. The measure would increase school security and repair and construct new classrooms in the Aromas-San Juan Unified School District. The measure authorizes $30.5 million in bonds. 55% voter approval required. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY

52.89% of voters have said YES to Measure A. The measure would authorize the Scotts Valley Unified School District to issue up to $49 million in bonds with bond revenue going to fund improvements to health and safety; and the repair of roofs, plumbing, sewer and electrical systems. 55% voter approval required. At this point, it's close but it's failing.

64.5% of voters have said YES to Measure N. The measure would authorize, for seven years, an annual parcel tax of $164 per parcel per year, thereby generating an estimated $328,000 per year for academic programs in the Loma Prieta Joint Union Elementary School District. Two-thirds voter approval required. At this time, it's close but failing.

SAN BENITO COUNTY

59.51% of voters have said NO to Measure N. It would enact the Strada Verde Specific Plan and amendments to the County General Plan and Zoning Code Amendments for 2,777 acres of agricultural land to allow for a wide range of uses. Those uses include research/development, automotive testing/tracks, offices, hospitality, and retail and require the creation of a 210-acre Pajaro River Park and preservation of 561 acres exclusively for agriculture. 50% + 1 voter approval required. 

STATE PROPOSITIONS

All require majority voter approval to pass. 

51.1% of voters have said YES to Proposition 14. The proposition would have California continue funding stem cell research, by borrowing up to $5.5 billion. 

52.0% of voters have said NO to Proposition 15. The proposition would hike property taxes on big businesses, raising billions for schools and local governments.  

57.2% of voters have said NO to Proposition 16. The proposition would restore affirmative action in California — meaning universities and government offices could factor in someone’s race, gender or ethnicity in hiring, spending and admissions decisions.

58.6% of voters have said YES to Proposition 17. The proposition would allow people on parole in California to vote.

56.0% of voters have said NO to Proposition 18. The proposition would allow 17-year-olds to vote in primary and special elections if they will be 18 and eligible by the next general election.

51.1% of voters have said YES to Proposition 19. The proposition would give Californians 55 or older a big property tax break when buying a new home. To fund that new tax break, it would curtail a separate tax break Californians may receive on homes inherited from parents and grandparents.

61.7% of voters have said NO to Proposition 20. The proposition would increase penalties for certain property crimes and repeated parole violations — and make it more difficult for some convicted felons to qualify for early parole and release from prison.

59.8% of voters have said NO to Proposition 21. The proposition would allow cities to pass rent control measures on almost all rental housing, as long as it’s more than 15 years old.

58.6% of voters have said YES to Proposition 22. The proposition would exempt gig companies like Uber and Lyft from a new state law requiring them to treat workers as employees.

63.4% of voters have said NO to Proposition 23. The proposition would require kidney dialysis clinics to have at least one physician present during all operating hours, and to report infection data to the state. It also would require that operators get approval from the state’s health department before closing a clinic, and prohibit clinics from discriminating against patients based on insurance type.

56.2% of voters have said YES to Proposition 24. The proposition would change California’s data privacy law in quite a few ways, such as how businesses handle sensitive data and creating a new state agency to enforce the privacy law, investigate violations and assess penalties.

56.4% of voters have said NO to Proposition 25. The proposition would transform how people get out of jail while awaiting trial — making California the first state to replace cash bail with an algorithm.

Thanks to CalMatters for sharing your proposition descriptions, explainers and videos with us.