Local Super Tuesday Results Certified

Mar 3, 2020

Updated: 04/03/2020 at 11:30am PST

 

*Santa Cruz County and Monterey County election results have been certified. As a note, jurisdictions who haven't certified their results yet do have until April 24, 2020 to do so, which may affect statewide results.

 

Over a dozen states held nominating contests on Super Tuesday (March 3, 2020), including California.

 

Bernie Sanders won California’s Democratic Prediential Primary election, the largest state with the largest delegate haul. He received 35.8% of the vote.

 

 

 

A full list of local results can be found at:

 

Monterey County Elections

 

Santa Cruz County Elections

 

California State Elections

   Local Candidate Races: 

In the race for U.S Representative District 18, which includes portions of San Mateo, Santa Clara and Santa Cruz counties, the incumbent Anna Eshoo got 61.7% of the vote and Rishi Kumar got 16.4% of the vote. Both Democrats advance to the November election. 

 

In the race for U.S. Representative District 20, which covers Monterey and San Benito Counties plus parts of Santa Cruz and Santa Clara Counties, Incumbent Democrat Jimmy Panetta received 66.2% of the vote. He’s set to face Rebuplican Jeff Gorman in November who received 20.3% of the vote. Democrat Adam Bolanas Scow got 13.5% of the vote. He does not advance through to the November ballot.

 

In the race for State Assembly District 29, which also covers the Monterey Bay Area, incumbent Democrat Mark Stone won 75.8% of the vote. His challenger Republican Shomir Banerjee won 24.2% of the vote. They both move forward to the November ballot.

 

In the race for State Assembly District 30, which covers the Salinas Valley and cities like Gilroy and Hollister, democratic incumbent Robert Rivas got 69.4% of the vote and moves through to November with Republican challenger Gregory Swett, who got 30.6% of the vote. 

 

In the race for State Senate District 17, which covers an area from south of San Jose all the way down to north of Santa Maria, Democrat John Laird got 44.4% of the vote and Republican Vicki Norhden got 31.5% of the vote. They will move forward to the November ballot.

 

In the Monterey County District 1 Supervisor race, Luis Alejo ran uncontested. His district includes most of the City of Salinas, including Alisal, parts central and north Salinas, Chinatown and part of Oldtown Salinas.

 

In the Monterey County District 4 Supervisor race Wendy Root Askew got 45.55% of the vote and Steve McShane got 34.98% of the vote. They move through to the November election.

 

In the Monterey County District 5 Supervisor race Mary Adams ran uncontested. Her district includes areas like Monterey, Carmel Valley, Big Sur and parts of Salinas.

 

In the Santa Cruz County District 1 Supervisor race, which includes Live Oak, Soquel, the Summit Area, Santa Cruz Gardens, and Carbonera, John Leopold got 45.4% of the vote and Manu Koenig got 30.5% of the vote. They move through to the November ballot.

 

In the Santa Cruz County District 2 Supervisor race, which includes the coastal communities of Aptos, La Selva Beach, Seacliff and Rio Del Mar, along with the communities of Corralitos, Freedom and the Pajaro River basin, Zach Friend retains his seat with 69.5% of the vote.

 

In the Santa Cruz County District 5 Supervisor race, which includes the San Lorenzo Valley, most of Scotts Valley, and a small part of Santa Cruz, Bruce McPherson ran uncontested.

 

In the race to choose the next Santa Cruz County Superior Court Judge, Nancy de la Pena received 44.67% of the vote. Annrae Angel received 30.33% of the vote. They will both proceed to the runoff in November.

 

In the Santa Cruz City Council recall election, both councilmembers Drew Glover and Chris Krohn lost their seats. 53.21% have voted to recall Glover and 51.02% to recall Krohn. Glover is replaced by Renee Golder (58.56%). Krohn is replaced by Katherine Beiers (55.17%). 

 

 

Local Measures:

 

Monterey County

 

Voters narrowly approved Measure A. That’s the $19.3 million, 34-year-bond for student safety and campus security upgrades in the King City Union School District. The measure received 55.76% of the vote (55% voter approval was required).

 

Voters also approved Measure B, a $18.9 million, 34-year-bond to renovate and modernize aging classrooms and facilities in the King City Union School District. The measure received 56.44% of the vote.

 

In the Pacific Grove Unified School District, voters approved Measure D. That’s a $30 million bond through approximately 2039 for student safety and school repair upgrades. The measure received 67.91% of the vote.

 

In the Soledad Unified School District, voters did not approved Measure E, a teacher-staff housing bond. The measure would have authorized a $11.5 million bond through 2049 to construct teacher-staff rental housing. The measure received 46.38% of the vote. It needed 55% to be approved.

 

In the Aromas-San Juan Unified School District, voters narrowly approved Measure M to repair and modernize classrooms and facilities. The measure re-authorizes a $4.2 million bond, previously approved by voters in 2012, through approximately 2031. The measure received 55.89% of the vote. It needed 55% to be approved.

 

Voters approved Measure C in the City of Carmel-by-the-Sea. The measure increases the current 1% sales tax to 1.5% to enhance the city’s green infrastructure of parks, trails and beaches; maintains public safety and emergency preparation; and funds capital needs among other things. The measure received 60.53% of the vote. Majority voter approval was required.

 

In the City of Del Rey Oaks, voters approved Measure F. It will indefinitely extend the 1% transactions and use tax to preserve essential city services and facilities, such as crime prevention. The measure received 71.59% of the vote. Majority voter approval was required.

 

In the City of Monterey, Measure G passed by 63.43% of the vote. The ½ cent per dollar sales tax for nine years will fund services such as police, fire, 911 emergency response, traffic management, senior & youth rec programs and other services. Majority voter approval was required.

 

Monterey and Santa Cruz County

 

Measure R appeared on both the Monterey County and Santa Cruz County ballots. Voters didn’t approve the measure in either county. 49.8% voted yes. The measure would have authorized a $274 million bond to repair and upgrade classrooms in the Cabrillo Community College District. It needed 55% to be approved.

 

Santa Cruz County

 

 

Measure M, the Aromas San Juan School Bond was approved. It needed 55% to pass and 61.11% of voters voted yes. A yes vote  authorizises the district to issue $4.2 million in bonds and requires an average tax rate of $20 per $100,000 of assessed property value for bond repayment.

 

Measure S, the San Lorenzo Valley School Dist Bond was approved. It needed 55% to pass and 55.12% of voters voted yes. A yes vote authorizes the district to issue $75 million in bonds and requires an average tax rate of $60 per $100,000 of assessed property value for bond repayment.

 

Measure T was approved by 74% of voters. A yes vote supports authorizing the Santa Cruz High School District to renew its annual parcel tax of $110 per parcel for school funding.

 

Measure U was approved by 79.85% of voters. A yes vote supports authorizing the Santa Cruz Elementary School District to renew the annual parcel tax of $208 per parcel.

 

Measure V was not approved by voters. A two-thirds majority vote was needed for this measure to pass. 63.51% voted yes. A no vote opposes authorizing the Soquel School District to impose, for six years, an annual parcel tax of $96 per parcel for school funding.

 

Measure W, was approved by 81.08% of voters. A yes vote amends the City Charter to allow greater flexibility in the process of contracting for major construction projects in the city of Santa Cruz.

 

Measure X was approved by 78.71% of voters. Santa Cruz City Schools were asking voters to amend the city charter to allow its board of trustees to be elected by district.

 

Measure Y was approved by 78.6% of voters. A yes vote supports authorizing the city of Watsonville to renew the 0.5% sales tax to go towards public safety services and the Community Services Department.

Measure Z was approved by 64.28% of voters. A yes vote authorizes the city of Scotts Valley to raise sales taxes to 9.75%.

 

 

State Propositions:

 

53% of voters said no to Proposition 13. The proposition would have authorized $15 billion in state general obligation bonds for construction and modernization of public education facilities.