Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the News Desk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

One day after the assassination of a prominent Iranian nuclear scientist, the country's leaders have made clear they intend to retaliate for a slaying they blame on Israel.

In separate statements delivered Saturday, both Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and President Hassan Rouhani threatened an aggressive response to the killing of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh near Tehran.

President Trump's push to overturn the election results suffered another in a series of defeats on Friday — this time in Wisconsin, where officials in the state's most populous county announced that a recount had added to President-elect Joe Biden's lead. Albeit slightly: Out of the roughly 460,000 ballots cast in Milwaukee County, Biden made a net gain of 132 votes on review.

The Duchess of Sussex has revealed that she suffered a miscarriage earlier this year. In a personal account published Wednesday in The New York Times, the former Meghan Markle said she had been pregnant, expecting her second child with Prince Harry, when a "sharp cramp" overwhelmed her in July.

Officials in Illinois have ordered an independent investigation into a coronavirus outbreak that killed 27 people at a state-operated veterans' home. The state's Department of Veterans' Affairs announced the decision in a statement Tuesday, pledging to "immediately address any findings from that investigation."

Have you seen Charles Darwin's missing notebooks? If so, the authorities — and some "heartbroken" librarians — would like to have a word with you.

Nearly two dozen rockets rained down on the Afghan capital Saturday, killing at least eight people and marking an inauspicious start to a day that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had earmarked for discussing peace efforts in Afghanistan.

A spokesperson for the Afghan Interior Ministry said that the attacks launched from two vehicles hit at least six different neighborhoods of Kabul. In addition to the dead, at least 31 people were injured in the attack.

The Emmys have always had a soft spot for politicians. In the past two decades, the annual television awards have dealt out nods or outright wins for a slew of famous names: There's Selina Meyer, for one, not to mention Josiah Bartlet and Claire and Frank Underwood, among others.

The Azerbaijani military has entered Aghdam, the first of a cluster of districts around the disputed region of Nagorno-Karabakh to be ceded to the country in its recent cease-fire with Armenia. Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev announced the troops' entry in a celebratory address to the country Friday.

Pfizer is formally asking federal authorities to authorize its COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use. The pharmaceutical giant and its partner BioNTech announced that they are submitting their request to the Food and Drug Administration on Friday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is strongly recommending that people stay home for Thanksgiving to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus. With the holiday one week away, the agency issued a statement that taking a trip to see loved ones is simply inadvisable right now.

Updated at 11 a.m. ET

With just two months remaining on its time in power, the Trump administration is capping its revisions of U.S. Middle East policy with another full-throated show of support for Israel. On Thursday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced a series of measures expressly aimed at countering the international movement to boycott, divest from or sanction Israel, also known as BDS.

Updated at 11:36 a.m. ET

Officials in Michigan's most populous county reversed course and certified its election results Tuesday evening, just a few hours after a surprising party-line deadlock suddenly cast the certification of more than 800,000 votes in doubt. Wayne County voted overwhelmingly for President-elect Joe Biden.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

Hurricane Iota, the second strong hurricane to batter Central America in as many weeks, is running aground in northeastern Nicaragua. The storm, which made landfall as a Category 4 hurricane Monday night, had rapidly diminished to Category 1 by Tuesday morning, with maximum sustained winds of about 75 mph.

It's not often that an English teacher can get quality bulletin board fodder from the local prosecutor's office. But don't be surprised if you see this document tacked up as motivational material in some classrooms next year.

British lawmakers have reached a damning conclusion about the possibility of Russian electoral interference in the U.K.: The Parliament's Intelligence and Security Committee said it can't determine whether the Kremlin tried to influence the 2016 Brexit referendum, because the British government hasn't even tried to find out.

The committee released that conclusion Tuesday in a long-awaited, oft-delayed and heavily redacted report.

Twitter says a total of 130 accounts were hacked in some fashion during a cybersecurity breach on Wednesday that affected some of its most prominent users, including Joe Biden and Kanye West.

French authorities believe that arson may be to blame for a fire that tore through a cathedral in Nantes that dates back to the 15th century. The city's mayor, Johanna Rolland, said officials have launched an investigation into the origins of the blaze, which wrought significant damage to parts of the Gothic structure on Saturday.

"It is a part of our history, a part of our heritage," Rolland told reporters, noting that it took more than 100 firefighters to bring the blaze under control.

For the Rev. C.T. Vivian, a jail cell was about as familiar as a police officer's fist. For his work during the height of the civil rights movement, the minister and activist was arrested more times than he cared to count and suffered several brutal beatings at the hands of officers throughout the South.

All the while, he held fast to one principle: "In no way would we allow nonviolence to be destroyed by violence," he recalled in an oral history recorded in 2011.

Europe's highest court has struck down a key agreement between the U.S. and the European Union concerning data privacy. In a ruling Thursday, the European Court of Justice found that the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield fails to protect Europeans' rights to data privacy when companies are transferring those data to the U.S.

Well, that did not last long.

Just over 24 hours after the sculpture of a Black Lives Matter protester went up in Bristol, the British city has pulled it down. Local officials removed artist Marc Quinn's statue of Jen Reid on Thursday morning, ending its brief stint atop a plinth that previously bore the statue of infamous slave trader Edward Colston.

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